Weekly Links

Is Marriage Good for Your Health?
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/18/magazine/18marriage-t.html?src=me&ref=general
Married people are healthier than lifelong singles, but divorced and widowed people do worst of all – and remarriage doesn’t help.
 
The US Supreme Court Takes on Text Message Evidence
http://abovethelaw.com/2010/04/text-ual-analysis-at-the-supreme-court/
Did one justice really ask about “the difference between a pager and an email”?
 
Books on Developing Creative Work
Making Ideas Happen – http://www.amazon.com/Making-Ideas-Happen-Overcoming-Obstacles/dp/159184312X/
The Creative Habit – http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Habit-Learn-Use-Life/dp/0743235274/
As lawyers, we don’t necessarily think that there’s a high degree of creativity in our day-to-day work.  However, fundamentally, our job is to be a salesman of stories.  I think there’s a lot to learn from fields that focus on the discipline of creativity.
 
Pro-Athlete Fines Deductible as Ordinary Business Expenses?
http://goingconcern.com/2010/04/tax-tip-for-pro-athletes-getting-fined-may-save-you-some-money/
“It might work out well for Chad Ochocinco to get fined on a weekly basis for wearing sombreros, bribing officials, and/or any other tomfoolery that the NFL finds fineable but without all the information it’s difficult to determine if this is actually a worthwhile tax-planning strategy.”
 
We Have Met the Enemy and He Is PowerPoint
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/world/27powerpoint.html?src=me&ref=general
An article on some of the drawbacks of using PowerPoint.  We’re not in quite the same position, since our industry is not yet saturated.  Also, sometimes the “drawbacks” could be benefits – numbing the audience, making complicated situations seem simplified, etc.
More on PowerPoint – Examples done right and done poorly
http://www.slate.com/id/2253050/

 Ask Unclutterer: Splitting the stuff in a divorce
http://unclutterer.com/2010/04/23/ask-unclutterer-splitting-the-stuff-in-a-divorce/
Some advice on downsizing after divorce.
 
Longest Known Sentence in a Legal Document?
http://www.loweringthebar.net/2010/04/longest-known-judicial-sentence.html
At 538 words, this surely sets some kind of record.  A real lesson in how poor legal writing can obscure meaning rather than making things clear.

Published by

Emily Miskel

Judge Emily Miskel was appointed by Texas Governor Greg Abbott as the first judge of the 470th family district court of Collin County, Texas. She graduated from Stanford University and Harvard Law School and she is board certified in family law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. Find Emily on Google+, Facebook, and other social media.

Leave a Reply